Strong volunteer programs start with strong leaders

Headshot - circleIF YOU are a leader of volunteers – and you care about running a quality program in a resource-challenged nonprofit world, then you are in the right place.

I’m Elisa, and I created Twenty Hats to provide volunteer managers like you with the skills you need to overcome tough challenges – and accomplish more for your program without adding hours to your day.

That’s why my coaching, courses, and retreats give you a personalized training experience. This is not the place for off-the-shelf learning. Plan on applying each new skill to your own workplace situation.

Leading a volunteer program is more than just a job – it’s a rewarding, purpose-driven professionif you are trained in best practices and supported to keep growing.

Let’s make your professional experience as fulfilling as possible!

What’s your spot on the org chart? When rotations are a bonus for #VolMgmt

Like a medical resident who rotates through specialties, reporting to different departments will ramp up your volunteer management expertise

How did your nonprofit decide where to house the volunteer program? Is it part of Development? Does it reside under Operations? How about Program, or Human resources?

Volunteer engagement intersects with so many different functions within our organizations. We are a gateway for community connection, an administrative function that serves one particular type of staff, and the steward to one of the most powerful methods of delivering service to clients. No wonder that nonprofits are often challenged to figure out where we belong.

There is one organization, though, that has embraced the complexity within volunteer management. At Hillwood Estate, Museum and Gardens in Washington, DC, the volunteer program has resided under multiple different umbrellas – and come out all the better for it.

Just ask Lisa Leyh, the Head of Visitor Services and Volunteer Management for the estate. In her 12 ½ years with Hillwood, Lisa has…read more