Welcome!

Strong volunteer programs begin with strong leaders

Headshot - circleIF YOU are a leader of volunteers – and you care about running a quality program in a resource-challenged nonprofit world, then you are in the right place.

I’m Elisa, and I created Twenty Hats to provide volunteer managers like you with the skills you need to overcome tough challenges – and accomplish more for your program without adding hours to your day.

That’s why my coaching, courses, and retreats give you a personalized training experience. This is not the place for off-the-shelf learning. Plan on applying each new skill to your own workplace situation.

Leading a volunteer program is more than just a job – it’s a rewarding, purpose-driven professionif you are trained in best practices and supported to keep growing.

Let’s make your professional experience as fulfilling as possible!

 

Why leaving volunteer management may be the best thing for the profession

Let’s not lament young colleagues who move up and out volunteer engagement. They’re the ones who will elevate the profession.

A few weeks back, Meridian Swift posted a blog about what she calls The Mokita. (and by the way, if you haven’t visited Meridian’s funny and wise site, VolunteerPlainTalk, start now!).

The Mokita post was all about the volunteer engagement profession’s Elephant in the Room: namely, that we volunteer managers see ourselves as undervalued and misunderstood.  And while the post is important on its own merits, the comments generated by the post are equally absorbing – especially the one by CVA Jerome Tenille.

Jerome wrote:

“We need more people with “backgrounds” in volunteer administration to take on these key [top leadership] roles, as decision makers. At the end of the day, it would be my goal that years from now, I AM that Executive Director, or CSR Program Manager, or CEO who can sit across from a Volunteer Coordinator, have an honest conversation and say “I understand your challenges, and I have your back,” and not because it sounds good, but because I’ve been in those shoes and have dedicated myself to the profession.”

Let’s take the conversation one step further, because this is often the point where our thinking gets stuck. Read more…