Strong volunteer programs start with strong leaders

Headshot - circleIF YOU are a leader of volunteers – and you care about running a quality program in a resource-challenged nonprofit world, then you are in the right place.

I’m Elisa, and I created Twenty Hats to provide volunteer managers like you with the skills you need to overcome tough challenges – and accomplish more for your program without adding hours to your day.

That’s why my coaching, courses, and retreats give you a personalized training experience. This is not the place for off-the-shelf learning. Plan on applying each new skill to your own workplace situation.

Leading a volunteer program is more than just a job – it’s a rewarding, purpose-driven professionif you are trained in best practices and supported to keep growing.

Let’s make your professional experience as fulfilling as possible!

What’s in a name? A lot, when it comes to volunteer nametags

Guest blogger Lisa Marie Porter, MA, CVA, empowered her volunteers to help her solve an unexpected problem. The results are pretty creative.

At the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, we take the practice of volunteer nametags one-step further than usual.

Even though our public engagement volunteers wear official credentials that designate them as ‘Volunteers,’ we still ask them to pin a special nametag to their uniform.

The idea behind it? To make personal connections with our visitors. The nametags share first names-only to make the volunteers more approachable, with the designation ‘Volunteer’ printed in the upper right-hand corner.

We thought our volunteers were perfectly happy with their nametags – until our museum went through a rebranding initiative. When we presented the volunteers with the new look of the nametags, we received some pretty vocal push-back. Read more…