VolunteerMatch’s Tess Srebro observes what’s top of mind for us

Serving Volunteer Managers - Twenty HatsSometimes, the best way to gain perspective on our work is to speak with someone NEAR the field rather than IN the field.

Tess Srebro counts as one of those nearby people. She is the Marketing Manager at VolunteerMatch. Tess represents the public voice of the organization in some important ways: editing not one but two blogs, managing the organization’s content calendar, social media, email campaigns, and probably a bunch of other responsibilities that did not make it to this list.

I got curious about Tess’s perspective on volunteer management through her role as editor of the Engaging Volunteers blog, which features content relevant to just about every volunteer engagement pro out there.  And as the promoter of content, she sees of what’s top of mind for most of us right now.

So what’s the number one most clicked-on, shared, and commented-on type of blog post?  Here are three possibilities:

  1. Retention
  2. Recognition
  3. Recruitment

If you picked b, you are right on the money.  According to Tess, any post about volunteer appreciation receives the most activity.  As the people-centered heart…

Read More

If you want success tracking volunteer prospects, retention — or anything else, you need one of these

Volunteer Management Systems - Twenty HatsIf you are an experienced volunteer engagement professional with a solid infrastructure and sound practices in tracking your program, you may not need to read this post.  Feel free to click out – although I’d love your feedback

And if you are newer to the volunteer management world, keep reading.  We’re talking this week about something straightforward and essential for any well-run volunteer program.

Having a database.

The subject came to mind last week when I facilitated a roundtable for Volunteer Alexandria on volunteer retention.

This particular group was great because they had such a strong grasp of the two sides to volunteer management: relationship-building and the need for systems.

We spent a lot of time discussing the fun part of our work − interacting with volunteers and recognizing their value – and just as much time discussing the equally important but less exciting subject of volunteer management systems (VMS).

That’s because having a system is necessary if you want to lead and grow a successful volunteer program.

That’s because the VMS is the keeper…

Read More

This volunteer engagement pro knows how to run a program that’s structured AND flexible – her motto sums it all up

Three catchy words- Twenty HatsIf you have gone through the process of becoming Certified in Volunteer Administration (CVA), you have probably done some extra thinking to articulate your philosophy of volunteer engagement. Just about every volunteer engagement pro operates with an underlying belief about what and how to engage volunteers – it’s just that we don’t think of it on a daily basis.

So I was impressed when I spoke with Trina Mayhan-Webb about the program she leads. Trina is the Director of Volunteer Solutions, a government agency within Fairfax County, Virginia that uses volunteers to support seniors and adults with disabilities.

Volunteer Solutions is a huge program that engages 4,000 volunteers annually with a staff of 10. You would think that such a large government-operated program might take a bureaucratic approach to managing volunteers.

Not so.

Trina’s program may employ best practice standards, but Trina’s philosophy is anything but rigid. In fact she has a simple motto that sums it up:

Reach – Teach – Unleash

[caption id=”attachment_2193″…

Read More

Trying to work miracles with limited resources? The solution starts with a mindset shift

Many years back when I recruited and trained volunteers, I remember my counterpart at a sister program quitting. She had come from the corporate world into what she hoped would be a more fulfilling job and got discouraged by the lack of resources for marketing the program.

At the time, I thought to myself” “Well, what did this person expect? It’s a nonprofit – we always have to make do with very little.”

Just like the fairy tale maiden in Rumpelstiltskin, we try and spin straw into gold.

The irony is that at the time my program had a grant to help us recruit volunteers. The funds from that grant covered paid ads for the program that we ran in local newspapers and even on television.

Those ads increased our inquiries exponentially. And sure enough, our numbers dropped when the funding ran out. When that happened, I returned to my usual strategies for volunteer recruitment, doing the best I could with what I had and never seeing the same results.

TED explains it all

I am reminded of that experience whenever…

Read More

Real top down support starts with the board and the strategic plan – and you have a role to play

A Place at the Table - Twenty HatsA question: when it comes to running your volunteer program, how would it feel if the Board of Directors had your back?

That’s what the volunteer director and her coordinators experience at Northern Virginia Family Service, where volunteer engagement is included in the strategic plan.  This organization sends a great message about volunteers and how they are valued for their capacity-building potential.

This message got me thinking: how many other nonprofits are this enlightened about the power of volunteers to advance a program’s mission?

Certainly I know of organizations that don’t acknowledge volunteers at the highest level. I recall one former workplace of mine that relied heavily on volunteers but chose not to mention volunteering in the strategic plan nor include information about the state of volunteerism in the environmental scan.  As if dollars were the only resource that mattered.

It’s easy to feel unrecognized in a situation like this and see only the barriers to creating a fully integrated volunteer program. But it…

Read More

This program manager earns the apple for her volunteer training methods

Whats Volunteer Training All About - Twenty HatsOf all of the phases of volunteer management that I blog about: marketing, screening, supervision, leadership – there is one thing I have not touched upon, and that’s training.

So I decided that the time had come to explore what’s important in a volunteer training program, and for that I turned to Amia Barrows.

Amia is the Program Manager for a sister program to my former workplace – Newport News CASA. She also sits on the National CASA Association’s Curriculum Development Committee, where she helped create an innovative flex training program. Amia has been active in the CASA world for over 11 years: this woman lives and breathes quality volunteer management.

Volunteers Who Can Meet the Mission

Knowing that Amia played a part in developing a nationally standardized training curriculum, I anticipated our conversation to be all about adult learning principles and educational techniques. After all, this is training – how do we help volunteers learn best? Amia is plenty competent in those areas, but that’s not what we discussed. Instead, she focused on…

Read More

Do older volunteers challenge your feedback?  Here are three tips for millennial volunteer managers

Supervising older volunteers - Twenty HatsOne of the advantages of working alongside volunteer engagement pros is that I get to pick up on common concerns within our profession.  Recently one of these all-too-common themes emerged when I facilitated a session on supervising volunteers.

Some of my students − very capable volunteer managers in their twenties, shared how difficult it was to work with volunteers who were a generation or two older than themselves.  They talked about their discomfort in giving direction to very experienced volunteers who sometimes challenged their feedback.  They found the supervision process discouraging because the older volunteers did not seem to take them seriously.

That got me to wondering: perhaps this issue has very little to do with the volunteers.  Perhaps, if you are a lot younger than your volunteers, you need to take yourself more seriously.

Think about it. 

Any volunteer who comes into your program and undergoes screening and training has implicitly agreed to abide by your program’s rules.  That gives you plenty of authority to provide direction when you need to – even if…

Read More

Need more hours in your work day? Liza Dyer has an app that might find you time to spare

togglHow much time do you spend interviewing potential volunteers? Between April 1 and December 1, I have spent 54 hours, 18 minutes, and 6 seconds on interviewing and placing volunteers. I know this because I use Toggl to track my time at work. Toggl is a simple time-tracking app and website where you can record how much time any task or project takes.

I use the free version which, so far, has served all my needs. There are tons of features, but I use it for the most basic: knowing how long something took me. (There are also paid packages if you need additional features.) Toggl offers free reports so you can review your projects over the last week, month, year, or a set period of time. One of my favorite things about Toggl is that it can integrate with Gmail, Google Docs, and Trello—all of which I use daily—if you download the free Google Chrome extension. The extension activates a button in Gmail, Google Docs, and Trello so…

Read More

When a short exercise went a long way towards staff engagement

engaging staff with volunteers - twenty hatsIn my local DOVIA, one of the most common workshop topic requests is “How to get staff on board with volunteer management.” It’s a complex subject, most likely because staff engagement brings us into the murky world of soft interpersonal skills. We anticipate barriers and may feel discouraged about achieving any sort of progress.

Sometimes, though, a hard skill exercise goes a long way towards nurturing staff engagement.

That was my recent take-away when talking with a volunteer coordinator who participated in my recruitment planning course. As part of the course she ran what I call a ‘DNA Study’of her successful volunteers.

In a ‘DNA Study’ you ask co-workers who supervise volunteers to provide a list of their most successful volunteers. Then, you run the demographic data to see what commonalities surface. The information is priceless when developing a profile of your ideal volunteer.

Unexpected Results

When my student ran her DNA study, she uncovered plenty of interesting findings about her volunteers – AND she noted one unexpected consequence: the process engaged the staff. Being consulted about the volunteers…

Read More

Get those favorite projects off the back burner — even when it seems time like there’s not enough time

Laughing at Time - Twenty HatsDoes this sound like you?  You have a project that is all your own, something that would really benefit your nonprofit and be fun to implement – a special program for your clients or a new training for your volunteers, but there is so much other work on your desk that the project never takes off.

The “too much work to get the fun and exciting stuff done” is an issue I hear lot from volunteer managers.  It’s a complaint uttered wistfully because we spend so much time attending to the needs of others.  Our jobs would feel so much more fulfilling if only we could put our mark on them.

Partly, we put the needs of others first because that’s why we do nonprofit work in the first place.  We want to improve the quality of life for other people.

More than that, not getting to our own projects may be a symptom of the scarcity mindset so often found in nonprofits, where we put all our energy into retaining…

Read More